General Mattis Quotes

“You are part of the world’s most feared and trusted force. Engage your brain before you engage your weapon.”

“You cannot allow any of your people to avoid the brutal facts. If they start living in a dream world, it’s going to be bad.”

“The most important 6 inches on the battlefield is between your ears.”

“If in order to kill the enemy you have to kill an innocent, don’t take the shot. Don’t create more enemies than you take out by some immoral act.”

“I come in peace. I didn’t bring artillery. But I’m pleading with you, with tears in my eyes: If you f— with me, I’ll kill you all.”

“Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet.”

“We’ve backed off in good faith to try and give you a chance to straighten this problem out. But I am going to beg with you for a minute. I’m going to plead with you, do not cross us. Because if you do, the survivors will write about what we do here for 10,000 years.”

“I don’t lose any sleep at night over the potential for failure. I cannot even spell the word.”

“A country that armed Stalin to defeat Hitler can certainly work alongside enemies of Al Qaeda to defeat Al Qaeda.”

“The first time you blow someone away is not an insignificant event. That said, there are some a–holes in the world that just need to be shot. There are hunters and there are victims. By your discipline, you will decide if you are a hunter or a victim.”

“You go into Afghanistan, you got guys who slap women around for five years because they didn’t wear a veil. You know, guys like that ain’t got no manhood left anyway. So it’s a hell of a lot of fun to shoot them. Actually it’s quite fun to fight them, you know. It’s a hell of a hoot. It’s fun to shoot some people. I’ll be right up there with you. I like brawling.”

“There are some people who think you have to hate them in order to shoot them. I don’t think you do. It’s just business.”

“Marines don’t know how to spell the word defeat.”

“PowerPoint makes us stupid.”

“In this age, I don’t care how tactically or operationally brilliant you are, if you cannot create harmony — even vicious harmony — on the battlefield based on trust across service lines, across coalition and national lines, and across civilian/military lines, you need to go home, because your leadership is obsolete. We have got to have officers who can create harmony across all those lines.”

“Find the enemy that wants to end this experiment (in American democracy) and kill every one of them until they’re so sick of the killing that they leave us and our freedoms intact.”

“Treachery has existed as long as there’s been warfare, and there’s always been a few people that you couldn’t trust.”

“Fight with a happy heart.”

“For the mission’s sake, for our country’s sake, and the sake of the men who carried the Division’s colors in past battles — ‘who fought for life and never lost their nerve’ — carry out your mission and keep your honor clean. Demonstrate to the world there is ‘No Better Friend — No Worse Enemy’ than a US Marine.”

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What You Need to Know About the US Military Ban on Flags Made in Other Countries

What’s more American than an American flag? Turns out that maybe it’s more than you think. Like a plethora of other items, American flags can be manufactured less expensively in China than they can here. flagusaNorth Bay, California Congressman Mike Thompson joined other citizens in being up in arms over the concept that our soldiers were carrying foreign-made flags into battle and in honorific processions. He proceeded to write legislation that requires all flags purchased by the U.S. Department of Defense be made in America; the legislation was signed into law as part of the 2014 omnibus appropriations bill.

While many Americans think that it’s bad enough that so few of our goods are actually “made in America”, they probably had no idea that it also applied to American flags. Since 1941, the Defense Department has been banned from buying food, clothes, uniforms, fabrics, stainless steel and hand or measuring tools that are not produced in the United States. Now, flags have been added to the list.

Part of the issue, though, was that post – 9/11, the surge of patriotism in the form of American flags flying from people’s homes and cars meant that U.S. manufacturers were having a hard time keeping up with demand. The new law guarantees that the Defense Department will not be spending American tax dollars on U.S. flags made overseas.

However, this does not mean that all American flags are homegrown; the law applies only to the Defense Department. Other agencies can still buy overseas-made flags. A bill similar to Thompson’s, but calling for a ban on all overseas-made flags purchased by government agencies, did not pass. Flags purchased by the federal government do need to be made from at least 50% of American-made materials, and this applies to all flags on federal buildings. Until now, about $3.3 million worth of American flags have been imported from Beijing each year.

The law isn’t perfect, though. Like plenty of legislation, there are loopholes. One is that American flags are considered textiles. That means that flags sold online don’t have origin labels that are required under federal law. The law should make a difference, but it makes no guarantees.

Fortunately, you can still find some retailers of American flags that manufacture and sell flags on American soil. For example, Gettysburg Flag Works in upstate New York is a small company that specializes in the manufacture of flags, flagpoles and other accessories. It’s a success story of a small, local retailer that moved its business online (though it continues to maintain its brick-and-mortar roots). These kinds of companies are cheering the legislation because they are exactly the kinds of businesses that it is designed to protect. Living in a global economy is an unavoidable truth — everything from the shoes on our feet to the vegetables we eat is imported from overseas. However, the American flag… the essence, arguably, of that for which this country stands… should be something that is made by U.S. workers on American soil.

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ROTC Scholarship – AmmoMan

ROTC Scholarship Applications Now Available

ROTC cadets looking to get a little bit of extra spending money or those who need help covering the costs of tuition are encouraged to apply for the first-ever AmmoMan.com ROTC Scholarships. Applications are open now for a pair of ROTC-exclusive, $500 scholarships for cadets enrolled at accredited 4-year colleges and universities. Two scholarships will be awarded in June to a pair of cadets who demonstrate excellence in the classroom and outstanding leadership skills within their cadre.

"We wanted to do something that would help bring attention to the young men and women who are dedicating a portion of their college years to helping serve their country as well as their local college campus," Eric Schepps of AmmoMan.com said. "We realize a lot of these men and women will go on to serve their country through the military and that commitment to serve as well as their commitment to personal development is something we appreciate. It’s worth encouraging that sort of behavior."

These ROTC Scholarships are open to cadets serving in any branch of ROTC so long as they maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average, or a B-average in their university’s respective grading system. However, the winning applicants will be more than just sharp in the classroom; a letter must accompany eligible applications from cadre leadership describing the cadet's leadership abilities.

"Many cadets enjoy the benefits of paid tuition if they commit to serve active duty military for four years after graduation but we realize that there are a lot more expenses and opportunities available to college-aged students than just inside the classroom. Further, there are a number of students who don't receive full tuition and are active leaders among their ROTC peers. It is our hope to help these students get the most from their time in college and recognize their dedication."

More information and the scholarship application are available at the AmmoMan.com ROTC Scholarship Page.

About AmmoMan.com: AmmoMan.com is among the oldest online ammo retailers on the web with an online history dating back to the late 90's. Based in New Jersey, AmmoMan.com's ROTC Scholarship is making its debut in 2014 as part of what the retailer hopes will be an annual and increasing effort to recognize our nation's future leaders.

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Corpsmen Celebrate 115 Years of Service

By MC1 James , Naval Hospital Pensacola Public Affairs
PENSACOLA, Fla. (NNS) — Hospital corpsmen have a long and proud tradition of excellence, honor, bravery and sacrifice as the Navy’s enlisted Medical Corps.

On June 17, 2013 the Navy’s Hospital Corps celebrated 115 years of service.

Wings of Hope

Hospital corpsmen perform their duties as assistants in the prevention and treatment of disease and injury and assist health care professionals in providing medical care to DoD personnel and their families. They may function as clinical or specialty technicians, medical administrative personnel or health care providers at Medical Treatment Facilities. They also serve as battlefield corpsmen with the Marine Corps, rendering emergency medical treatment to include initial treatment in a combat environment.

Since the inception of the Navy in 1775, the need for Sailors dedicated to the caring of the sick and injured has been a priority. There were surgeon’s mates in the late 1700’s, loblolly boys in 1841, male nurses in 1861, baymen in 1876 and finally the establishment of the Hospital Corps in 1898. The hospital corpsmen have a long and proud tradition of taking care of those in their charge.

Read the entire story here

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CT Veteran ID Law

Hooray for Connecticut!

GOV. MALLOY: VETERANS CAN NOW HAVE THEIR STATUS RECOGNIZED ON DRIVERS’ LICENSES, STATE-ISSUED ID CARDS

(HARTFORD, CT) – Governor Dannel P. Malloy and Lieutenant Governor Nancy Wyman today announced that military veterans can now apply to have their status marked on a Connecticut Driver’s License or state-issued ID. The Department of Motor Vehicles and AAA offices on January 2, 2013 will begin issuing drivers’ licenses and ID cards that will include the symbol of an American Flag to identify veteran status.

“We owe so much to the brave members of our Armed Forces,” said Governor Malloy. “This symbol on drivers’ licenses and ID cards is a small step we can take to make sure our veterans have a more convenient way to access the benefits and services they have earned.”

“Adding this symbol to state issued IDs is great way to make sure that veterans always have the documentation they need when they attempt to access different services,” said Lieutenant Governor Wyman. “Combined with the launch of our new website – www.Veterans.ct.gov – we are making it easier than ever for Veterans to received the benefits they are entitled to.”

“The veteran identifier on the CT driver’s license or state-issued ID card will help first responders, emergency rooms and healthcare providers to identify veterans that are eligible for programs and services from both the Department of Veterans’ Affairs and the VA. We hope that veterans will see this as a symbol of our pride in them,” Department of Veterans Affairs Commissioner Linda Schwartz said.

“DMV is extremely proud to offer this service and honor all those who have sacrificed so much to protect our country,” DMV Commissioner Melody A. Currey said.

At least 30 days prior to visiting a DMV or AAA office, veterans must submit to the state Department of Veterans’ Affairs a completed application and proof of honorable discharge, such as a DD-214. The Department of Veterans Affairs will verify the veteran’s military status and electronically notify DMV of the request prior to the driver’s license or ID card being issued.

The application can be downloaded online at the Department of Veterans’ Affairs website by visiting www.ct.gov/ctva and clicking the “Application for Veteran’s Flag” link. The flag symbol will be added to veteran’s license or ID card at no additional cost at renewal time or when it is first issued. Veterans can request a flag symbol by mailing an application and additional documentation to the state Department of Veterans’ Affairs at: CT DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS’ AFFAIRS, ATTN: VETERAN’S FLAG ON DRIVER LICENSE OR ID CARD, 287 WEST ST., ROCKY HILL, CT 06067.

For more information on DMV services and office locations, please visit www.ct.gov/dmv or http://www.ct.gov/ctva

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TEXAS FLAG

Manner of Retirement

I am your Texas flag!

I was born January 25, 1839.

I am one of only two flags of an American state that has also served as the symbol of an independent nation–The Republic of Texas.
While you may honor me in retirement, the spirit I represent will never retire!

I represent the spirit of Texas–Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow!

I represent the bravery of the Alamo and the Victory at San Jacinto.

My spirit rode with the Texas Rangers over the Forts Trail of the Big Country and herded cattle through the Fort Worth stockyards.

I have sailed up Galveston Bay and kept a watchful eye over our El Paso del Norte.

My colors are in the waters of the Red River and in the Bluebonnets of the Texas Hill Country.

You’ll find my spirit at the Light House of Palo Duro and in the sands of Padre Island;

I am in the space station at Houston and atop the oil wells of West Texas.

From the expanse of the Big Bend to the Riverwalk of San Antone–all of Texas is my home!

I wave over the cotton and grain fields of the High Plains, and I am deep in the rich soil of the Rio Grande Valley.

I am proudly displayed under the Capitol Dome, and I fly high above the concrete canyons of downtown Dallas.

You’ll find my spirit in the East Texas piney woods and along the Grandeur of the Rio Grande.

I represent Texas–every Child, Woman, and Man!

The blue field in me stands for the valor of our ancestors in the battles for our country.
Let us retire the blue–Salute!

My white field stands for the purity in all our Texas hearts! It represents the honor that each of us should pay to our state each day.
Let us retire the white–Salute!

The red is for all of the men and women who have died in service of our state–whether as members of the armed services or as citizen Samaritans.
Let us retire the red–Salute!

My lone, independent star is recognized worldwide because it represents ALL of Texas and stands for our unity as one for God, State, and Country.
Let us retire the lone star–Salute!

Join in the pledge to the Texas flag:

“Honor the Texas flag; I pledge allegiance to thee, Texas, one state under God, one and indivisible.”

Source: http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/GV/htm/GV.3100.htm

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Drive On

My good friend Jim Hatch (USMC, RVN) is a talented artist and one of my favorite songs he does is called “Drive On”, written by Johnny Cash after he and his wife June returned from a USO tour in Viet Nam. With Jim’s permission, please take a minute and listen to “Drive On!

If you enjoy “Drive On”, drop Jim a note and you might even want to buy his awesome CD with more super songs.

Jim was in-country with HMM-161, H&MS-17 & VMGR-152.
His e-mail address is cwfhat@pacbell.net

Another good friend, Gordon Boswell 1st Force Recon, Vietnam, says when times get tough, he remembers this song and just drives on!

Share your thoughts.

“Drive On”

I got a friend named Whiskey Sam
He was my boonierat buddy for a year in Nam
He said I think my country got a little off track
Took ’em twenty-five years to welcome me back
But, it’s better than not coming back at all
Many a good man
I saw fall And even now,
every time I dream I hear the men
and the monkeys in the jungle scream

Drive on, don’t mean nothin’
My children love me , but they don’t understand
And I got a woman who knows her man
Drive on, don’t mean nothin’, drive on

I remember one night,
Tex and me Rappelled in on a hot L.Z.
We had our 16’s on rock and roll
But, with all that fire,
was scared and cold
We were crazy, we were wild
And I have seen the tiger smile
I spit in a bamboo viper’s face
And I’d be dead , but by God’s grace

Drive on, don’t mean nothin’
My children love me, but they don’t understand
And I got a woman who knows her man
Drive on, don’t mean nothin’, drive on

It was a real slow walk in a real sad rain
And nobody tried to be John Wayne
I came home, but Tex did not
And I can’t talk about the hit he got
I got a little limp now when
I walk Got a little tremolo when
I talk But my letter read from Whiskey Sam
You’re a walkin’ talkin’ miracle from Vietnam

Drive on, don’t mean nothin’
My children love me, but they don’t understand
And I got a woman who knows her man
Drive on, don’t mean nothin’, drive on

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