Brief History of MCRD San Diego, 1914-1962

By Elmore A. Champie

The Marine Corps Base at San Diego is surrounded by evidences of the Spanish heritage of southern California. Among the more conspicuous are the euphonious place names found everywhere , including the name San Diego itself, and the picturesque architecture that may be seen, not only in the city, but also in the permanent buildings of the Marine Corps post. This is a natural consequence of the fact that California was a Spanish possession for nearly three centuries. The region was claimed for Spain in 1542 by Juan Rodriquez Cabrillo, a Portuguese navigator in the services of Charles V and the first white man to see San Diego Bay. It remained under Spanish control until 1821, when Mexico won her independence from Spain. Thereafter, for about a quarter of a century, California was claimed by Mexico.

Cpl. Beddoe flying over MCRD San Diego in a restored USMC Sikorsky UH-34D Helicopter
Cpl. Beddoe flying over MCRD San Diego in a restored USMC Sikorsky UH-34D Helicopter

Geography and the westward expansion of the United States now brought the Marines into their first contact with San Diego. The town was seized by a landing party of seamen and Marines from the USS Cyane on 29 July 1846, shortly after war had broken out between the United States and Mexico. It was in this operation that the Stars and Stripes was first raised in southern California. Marines were also among the reinforcements sent early the following December to assist Brigadier General Stephen W. Kearny, USA, and his dragoons in completing the final portion of their march from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to San Diego/ Despite the harassment of Andres Pico’s lancers, Kearny succeeded in reaching San Diego on 12 December 1846. Hostilities in the California theater of operations ceased about a month later; and when the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo formally ended the war in 1848, Mexico ceded to the United States a large block of territory that included California.

Geography – an important element, as we have noted, in the foregoing events – has been a constant factor in the working out of San Diego’s destiny with respect to the Marine Corps. Only 12 miles north of the Mexican border and possessed of an excellent harbor, the city readily recommended itself to the strategic eye as an expeditionary base on the west coast when the need for such a base became evident in the early twentieth century. San Diego was not only convenient to the Pacific approaches of Latin America, where it was apparent that trouble could be expected at intervals, but it could also serve advantageously as a port of embarkation for Hawaii and the Par East* Concrete action toward establishing a base there, however, awaited some precipitating event. Mexican political Instability was to provide the catalyst that returned the Marines to San Diego for the first time since the Mexican War and subsequently caused a permanent Marine Corps post to be established there.

CLICK PDF to read the entire history:

mcrdsd_history

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Death of General Carl E. Mundy, Jr., 30TH Commandant

Date Signed: 4/03/2014
ALMARS Active Number: 008/14
R 031935Z APR 14
UNCLASSIFIED/
ALMAR 008/14

MSGID/GENADMIN,USMTF,2007/CMC WASHINGTON DC DMCS(UC)/F002//
SUBJ/DEATH OF GENERAL CARL E. MUNDY, JR., 30TH COMMANDANT OF THE MARINE CORPS//
GENTEXT/REMARKS/

1. IT IS WITH GREAT SADNESS THAT I ANNOUNCE THE DEATH OF GENERAL CARL E. MUNDY, JR., U.S. MARINE CORPS, RETIRED, THE 30TH COMMANDANT OF THE MARINE CORPS. GENERAL MUNDY PASSED AWAY EARLY IN THE MORNING OF APRIL 3, 2014.

2. ALL MARINE CORPS INSTALLATIONS WILL HALF-MAST THE NATIONAL ENSIGN UPON RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE UNTIL SUNSET ON THE DAY OF INTERMENT. MORE INFORMATION WILL FOLLOW VIA SEPARATE CORRESPONDENCE.

3. JAMES F. AMOS, GENERAL, U.S. MARINE CORPS, COMMANDANT OF THE MARINE CORPS.//

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Corps is going sleeves up

Headquarters Marine Corps
Commandant Gen. James F. Amos: Corps is going sleeves up
By Gen. James F. Amos | Headquarters Marine Corps | February 25, 2014
WASHINGTON

Sgt. Maj. Barrett and I have now spoken to the majority of you about our efforts to “Reawaken the Soul of our Corps.” Each time that we have talked with you, we come away with a strong belief that you “get it.” You understand that our renewed focus on the four enduring principles of: DISCIPLINE; ADHERENCE TO STANDARDS; ENGAGED AND CONCERNED LEADERSHIP (24/7); and FAITHFUL OBEDIENCE TO ORDERS, is key to resetting the Corps and getting ready for tomorrow’s fight. You understand that those 4 principles define what we have called “The Soul of the Corps.” They have been with us for over 238 years…it’s always been that way.

2-27-2014 12-28-06 PM

As we complete the mission in Afghanistan, it’s critical to understand that there will be no “peace dividend” for America’s Marines…there will be no operational pause for us. The world that we will live and operate in over the next two decades will be a dangerous one; there will be plenty of work for those who wear our cloth.

As we have travelled throughout our Corps, many of you have let us know how important your identity as a Marine is to you and the Marines you lead. I can’t tell you how many times we have been asked the persistent question “Commandant, are we ever going to return to SLEEVES UP?” I’ve thought a lot about this over the past 2 .5 years; I realize that it’s important to you. Sleeves up clearly and visually sets us apart.

WE HEAR YOU MARINES!

Because of the persistence of you, my Sergeants and Corporals, this evening I am publishing a MARADMIN that will return us to SLEEVES UP status when wearing our Desert CAMMIES in non-combat areas. This will take effect on 9 March when we transition to our summer warmer weather uniforms. Get the word out Marines.

Thank you for your leadership in some very challenging times!!!

Semper Fidelis
Commandant Gen. James F. Amos: Corps is going sleeves up

Source

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How the Marines have survived, and why

MAY 6, 2013, VOL. 18, NO. 32 • BY MACKUBIN THOMAS OWENS

In 1957, the commandant of the Marine Corps, General Randolph Pate, sent a brief note to the director of the Marine Corps Educational Center, Brig. Gen. Victor Krulak, in which he asked, “Why does the U.S. need a Marine Corps?” Krulak, already a legend in the Marines, penned a lengthy reply: “The United States does not need a Marine Corps mainly because she has a fine modern Army and a vigorous Air Force. .  .  . We [the Marine Corps] exist today—we flourish today—not because of what we know we are, or what we know we can do, but because of what the grassroots of our country believes we are and believes we can do.”

BOB.v18-32.May6_.Owens_Krulak went on to say that the American people believe three things about the Marines: that they will be ready to fight on short notice; that they will turn in a dramatically and decisively successful performance; and that the “Corps is downright good for the manhood of our country; that the Marines are masters of a form of unfailing alchemy which converts un-oriented youths into proud, self-reliant stable citizens—citizens into whose hands the nation’s affairs may safely be entrusted.” Krulak concluded that as long as the American people “are convinced that we can really do the three things .  .  . we are going to have a Marine Corps. .  .  . And, likewise, should the people ever lose that conviction—as a result of our failure to meet their high—almost spiritual—standards, the Marine Corps will then quickly disappear.”

Read the entire STORY

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USMC: Commitment, Semper Fi

Our strength lies not in our numbers, but in our commitment. In the Marine Corps, it’s called Semper Fidelis. It means always faithful — to our country, to the Corps, to each other.

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USMC 236th Birthday Message

The Commandant of the Marine Corps and Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps present the 236th Marine Corps birthday message and honor the 10th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and the 70th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, and how the events shaped the lives of Marines past and present.

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Sgt. Maj. to Marines: Read these books

By Dan Lamothe – Staff writer
Posted : Monday Aug 22, 2011 10:06:50 EDT

Sgt. Maj. Mike Barrett has unveiled a new reading list for Marines, highlighting 54 titles that he said capture the history, culture and evolution of the Marine Corps.

The development of the “Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Library” shows the value the service’s top enlisted leader places on reading, Barrett said in an Aug. 11 interview in his office. He said he reads frequently and gives Marines copies of books he has enjoyed while traveling.

“Yeah, I’ve got my coin, and there’s a time and place for giving coins,” he said. “But, do you know what I’d rather give a Marine? Something they can actually use. I’m one of those guys who likes practical gifts.”

The library was developed with the assistance of the Marine Corps Association, he said. He visits the organization virtually every time he is at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va., and often buys books there.

The library includes nearly two dozen books that are on Commandant Gen. Jim Amos’ Marine Corps Professional Reading Program list, including perennially quoted books like, “First to Fight: An Inside View of the U.S. Marine Corps,” by the late Lt. Gen. Victor Krulak.

However, it also includes books about wounded warriors, military working dogs and the business world.

For example, one title is “Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap … And Others Don’t.” It profiles Fannie Mae, Gillette, Walgreens and eight other companies that succeeded by finding and promoting disciplined people. Another is “Semper Fi: Business Leadership the Marine Corps Way.”

Barrett will leave his office library behind after he leaves his post at the Pentagon, and wants it to grow in the future, he said.

The following titles comprise Barrett’s library, located at the Pentagon. Check out the Marine Corps Professional Reading Program list at marinecorpstimes.com/links/read.

Barrett’s list:

“13 Cent Killers: The 5th Marine Snipers in Vietnam,” by John J. Culbertson

“Achilles in Vietnam: Combat Trauma and the Undoing of Character,” by Jonathan Shay

“Always Faithful: A Memoir of the Marine Dogs of WWII,” by William W. Putney

“Baghdad at Sunrise: A Brigade Commander’s War in Iraq,” by Peter R. Mansoor

“Band of Brothers: E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne From Normandy to Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest,” by Stephen Ambrose

“Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era,” by James M. McPherson

“Bayonet! Forward: My Civil War Reminiscences,” by Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain

“Breakout: The Chosin Reservoir Campaign, Korea 1950,” by Martin Russ

“Carnage and Culture: Landmark Battles in the Rise to Western Power,” by Victor Davis Hanson

“Colder Than Hell: A Marine Rifle Company at Chosin Reservoir,” by Joseph R. Owen

“Courage After Fire: Coping Strategies for Troops Returning from Iraq and Afghanistan and their Families,” by Keith Armstrong, Dr. Suzanne Best, Dr. Paula Domenici and Bob Dole

“Defeat Into Victory: Battling Japan in Burma and India, 1942-1945,” by Field-Marshal Viscount William Slim and David Hogan

“Edson’s Raiders: The 1st Marine Raider Battalion in World War II,” by Joseph H. Alexander

“Endless War: Middle-Eastern Islam vs. Western Civilization,” by Ralph Peters

“Fields of Battle: The Wars for North America,” by John Keegan

“First to Fight: An Inside View of the U.S. Marine Corps,” by Victor H. Krulak

“Gates of Fire: An Epic Novel of the Battle of Thermopylae,” by Steven Pressfield

“Gods and Generals,” by Jeff Shaara

“Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap … And Others Don’t,” by Jim Collins

“Guadalcanal: The Definitive Account of the Landmark Battle,” by Richard B. Frank

“Heroes Among Us,” by Major Chuck Larson, John McCain And General Tommy Franks

“Iwo Jima: Portrait of a Battle: United States Marines at War in the Pacific,” by Eric Hammel

“Leading the Charge: Leadership Lessons from the Battlefield to the Boardroom,” by Tony Zinni and Tony Koltz

“Matterhorn: A Novel of the Vietnam War,” by Karl Marlantes

“A Message to Garcia,” by Elbert Hubbard

“Okinawa: The Last Battle of World War II,” by Robert Leckie

“Once a Marine: The Memoirs of General A. A. Vandegrift Commandant of the U.S. Marines in WW II,” by A.A. Vandegrift and Robert B. Asprey

“Once a Marine: An Iraq War Tank Commander’s Inspirational Memoir of Combat, Courage, and Recovery,” by Nick Popaditch and Mike Steere

“Patton: A Genius for War,” by Carlo D’Este

“The Reminiscences of a Marine,” by John Archer Lejeune

“Rifleman Dodd,” by C.S. Forester

“The Savage Wars of Peace: Small Wars and the Rise of American Power,” by Max Boot

“Semper Fi: Business Leadership the Marine Corps Way,” by Dan Carrison and Rod Walsh

“Silent Warrior: The Marine Sniper’s Story Vietnam Continues,” by Charles Henderson

“Soldiers of God: With Islamic Warriors in Afghanistan and Pakistan,” by Robert D. Kaplan

“The Art of War,” by Sun Tzu

“The Bridge at Dong Ha,” by John Grider Miller

“The Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War,” by David Halberstam

“The Face of Battle: A Study of Agincourt, Waterloo, and the Somme,” by John Keegan

“The General,” by C.S. Forrester

“The Gift of Valor: A War Story,” by Michael M. Phillips

“The Last Stand of Fox Company: A True Story of U.S. Marines in Combat,” by Robert Drury and Tom Clavin

“The Lions of Iwo Jima,” by Major General Fred Haynes and James A. Warren

“The Marines of Montford Point: America’s First Black Marines,” by Melton Alonza Mclaurin

“The Mask of Command,” by John Keegan

“The Navajo Code Talkers,” by Doris A. Paul

“The Village,” by Bing West

“Tiger Force: A True Story of Men and War,” by M. Sallah and M. Weiss

“Victory at High Tide: The Inchon Seoul Campaign,” by Robert Debs Heinl

“War in the Pacific 1941-1945,” by Richard Overy and Dale Dye

“We Were One: Shoulder to Shoulder with the Marines Who took Fallujah,” by Patrick K. O’Donnell

“We Were Soldiers Once … And Young: Ia Drang — The Battle That Changed the War in Vietnam,” by Harold G. Moore and Joseph L. Galloway

“With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa,” by E.B. Sledge

“Wounded Warriors: Those for Whom the War Never Ends,” by Mike Sager

Sgt. Maj. to Marines: Read these books

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2011 USMC Recruiting Commercial

2011 USMC Recruiting Commercial

OUTSTANDING!
SEMPER FI!

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Marine Corps Reading List 2011

REVISION OF THE MARINE CORPS PROFESSIONAL READING PROGRAM LIST 
Date Signed: 7/8/2011 
ALMAR  Active  Number: 027/11  2011 

R 082003Z JUL 11, UNCLASSIFIED//, LMAR 027/11, MSGID/GENADMIN/CMC WASHINGTON DC DMCS//, SUBJ/REVISION OF THE MARINE CORPS PROFESSIONAL READING PROGRAM LIST//, REF/A/MSGID:MSG/CMC WASHINGTON DC CMC/081912ZSEP2009//, AMPN/REF A IS ALMAR 029/09, UPDATE TO MARINE CORPS PROFESSIONAL READING LIST.//

GENTEXT/REMARKS/

1.  TO ENSURE THE MARINE CORPS PROFESSIONAL READING LIST REMAINS RELEVANT, A REVIEW BOARD WAS CONDUCTED TO REVISE THE LIST IN ORDER TO REVITALIZE THE PROFESSIONAL READING PROGRAM.  THIS ALMAR ANNOUNCES THE REVISED MARINE CORPS PROFESSIONAL READING PROGRAM LIST.

2.  ACTION.  EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY, COMMANDING GENERALS AND COMMANDING OFFICERS ARE TO INCORPORATE THE NEW LISTS INTO THEIR COMMAND AND UNIT PROFESSIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION PROGRAMS.

A.  EACH MARINE IS REQUIRED TO READ THE COMMANDANT’S CHOICE, “FIRST TO FIGHT:  AN INSIDE VIEW OF THE U.S. MARINE CORPS” BY LTGEN VICTOR H. KRULAK, USMC (RET.).

B.  EACH MARINE SHALL ALSO READ A MINIMUM OF ONE BOOK PER GRADE PER YEAR.  I STRONGLY ENCOURAGE MARINES TO DISCUSS AND DEBATE THE ISSUES RAISED BY THE BOOKS ON THIS LIST TO BROADEN THEIR PERSPECTIVES AND BENEFIT FROM THE EXPERIENCES OF OTHERS.  THESE DISCUSSIONS, CONDUCTED PROFESSIONALLY, SHOULD UNITE MARINES OF VARYING RANKS BY PROVIDING A COMMON LITERARY FRAME OF REFERENCE.

C.  COMPLETION OF THIS REQUIREMENT SHALL BE NOTED IN THE INDIVIDUAL MARINE’S PROFICIENCY/CONDUCT (PRO/CON) REMARKS OR FITNESS REPORT, AS APPROPRIATE.

D.  HOW A MARINE DEMONSTRATES COMPLETION OF THE ANNUAL REQUIREMENT IS AT THE DISCRETION OF THE COMMAND.

3.  READING LIST BY GRADE

A.  COMMANDANT’S CHOICE BOOK.  “FIRST TO FIGHT:  AN INSIDE VIEW OF THE U.S. MARINE CORPS” BY LTGEN VICTOR H. KRULAK, USMC (RET.).

B.  RECRUIT/POOLEE
“I’M STAYING WITH MY BOYS” BY JIM PROSER AND JERRY CUTTER
“THE UNITED STATES MARINES:  A HISTORY” BY EDWIN H. SIMMONS

C.  PRIVATE/PRIVATE FIRST CLASS
“A MESSAGE TO GARCIA” BY ELBERT HUBBARD
“RIFLEMAN DODD” BY C.S. FORESTER
“BLINK” BY MALCOLM GLADWELL
“1984” BY GEORGE ORWELL
“NO TRUE GLORY” BY BING WEST
“THE GIFT OF VALOR” BY MICHAEL M. PHILLIPS

D.  LANCE CORPORAL
“THE 360 DEGREE LEADER” BY JOHN MAXWELL
“THE AFGHAN CAMPAIGN” BY STEVEN PRESSFIELD
“MY MEN ARE MY HEROES” BY NATHANIEL R. HELMS
“STARSHIP TROOPERS” BY ROBERT HEINLEIN
“THE UGLY AMERICAN” BY EUGENE BURDICK AND WILLIAM J. LEDERER
“WE WERE ONE” BY PATRICK K. O’DONNELL

E.  CORPORAL
“AFGHANISTAN” BY STEPHEN TANNER
“ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT” BY ERICH MARIA REMARQUE
“CHOSEN SOLDIER” BY DICK COUCH
“FLAGS OF OUR FATHERS” BY JAMES BRADLEY
“GHOST SOLDIERS” BY HAMPTON SIDES
“NOBLE WARRIOR” BY JAMES E. LIVINGSTON, COLIN D. HEATON, AND ANNE-MARIE LEWIS
“ONCE A MARINE” BY NICK POPADITCH AND MIKE STEERE
“THE DEFENCE OF DUFFER’S DRIFT” BY ERNEST DUNLOP SWINTON
“MARINES IN THE GARDEN OF EDEN” BY RICHARD LOWRY

F.  SERGEANT
“AMERICAN SOLDIERS” BY PETER S. KINDSVATTER
“COMMON SENSE TRAINING” BY ARTHUR S. COLLINS
“COUNTERINSURGENCY WARFARE” BY DAVID GALULA
“FROM THE HORSE’S MOUTH” BY MAJOR TED MCKELDIN
“THE KILLER ANGELS” BY MICHAEL SHAARA
“A SOLDIER’S LOAD AND THE MOBILITY OF A NATION” BY S.L.A. MARSHALL
“STORM OF STEEL” BY ERNST JUNGER
“THE VILLAGE” BY BING WEST
“TIP OF THE SPEAR” BY G.J. MICHAELS
“WITH THE OLD BREED” BY E.B. SLEDGE

G.  STAFF SERGEANT
“A BELL FOR ADANO” BY JOHN HERSEY
“AMERICAN SPARTANS” BY JAMES A. WARREN
“THE ARAB MIND” BY RAPHAEL PATAI
“ATTACKS” BY ERWIN ROMMEL
“BATTLE CRY” BY LEON URIS
“THE DEFENSE OF HILL 781” BY JAMES MCDONOUGH
“THE FACE OF BATTLE” BY JOHN KEEGAN
“THE LAST STAND OF FOX COMPANY” BY BOB DRURY AND TOM CLAVIN
“MCCOY’S MARINES” BY JOHN KOOPMAN
“ON KILLING” BY DAVE GROSSMAN
“SOLDIERS OF GOD” BY DAVID HAGBERG
“THE SPEED OF TRUST” BY STEPHEN M.R. COVEY

H.  GUNNERY SERGEANT
“AFGHAN GUERILLA WARFARE” BY ALI JALALI AND LESTER W. GRAU
“TIGER FORCE:  A TRUE STORY OF MEN AND WAR” BY M. SALLAH AND M. WEISS
“ISLANDS OF THE DAMNED” BY R.V. BURGIN AND BILL MARVEL
“KILLING GROUND ON OKINAWA” BY JAMES H. HALLAS
“THE MISSION, THE MEN, AND ME” BY PETE BLABER
“ON COMBAT” BY DAVE GROSSMAN AND LOREN W. CHRISTENSEN
“RIDE THE THUNDER” BY RICHARD BOTKIN
“THE SAVAGE WARS OF PEACE” BY MAX BOOT
“VICTORY AT HIGH TIDE” BY ROBERT D. HEINL
“WE WERE SOLDIERS ONCE AND YOUNG” BY HAROLD G. MOORE AND JOSEPH L. GALLOWAY

I.  MASTER SERGEANT/FIRST SERGEANT
“THE ACCIDENTAL GUERILLA” BY DAVID KILCULLEN
“COURAGEOUS FOLLOWER” BY IRA CHALEFF
“FIELDS OF BATTLE” BY JOHN KEEGAN
“FORGOTTEN WARRIORS” BY THOMAS HAMMES
“GHOST WARS” BY STEVE COLL
“THE GUNS OF AUGUST” BY BARBARA W. TUCHMAN
“THE LEXUS AND THE OLIVE TREE” BY THOMAS FRIEDMAN
“THE PASSION OF COMMAND” BY BRYAN MCCOY
“SEVEN DEADLY SCENARIOS” BY ANDREW KREPINEVICH
“THE SLING AND THE STONE” BY THOMAS X. HAMMES
“TECHNOLOGY AND WAR” BY MARTIN L. VAN CREVELD

J.  MASTER GUNNERY SERGEANT/SERGEANT MAJOR
“ACHILLES IN VIETNAM” BY JONATHAN SHAY
“AT THE WATER’S EDGE: DEFENDING AGAINST THE MODERN AMPHIBIOUS ASSAULT” BY THEODORE GATCHEL
“THE CRISIS OF ISLAM” BY BERNARD LEWIS
“THE COLDEST WAR” BY DAVID HALBERSTAM
“CRISIS LEADERSHIP” BY GENE KLANN
“THE GENERAL” BY C.S. FORRESTER
“THE MASK OF COMMAND” BY JOHN KEEGAN
“NO BENDED KNEE” BY MERRIL B. TWINING
“ON WAR” BY CARL VON CLAUSEWITZ
“A PEACE TO END ALL PEACE” BY DAVID FROMKIN

K.  OFFICER CANDIDATE/MIDSHIPMAN
“THE ARMED FORCES OFFICER,” DOD
“MY MEN ARE MY HEROES” BY NATHANIEL R. HELMS
“UNITED STATES MARINES: A HISTORY” BY EDWIN H. SIMMONS
“ON INFANTRY” BY JOHN A. ENGLISH

L. 2ND LIEUTENANT/WARRANT OFFICER/CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 2
“THE ART OF WAR” BY SUN TZU
“BLINK” BY MALCOLM GLADWELL
“COUNTERINSURGENCY WARFARE” BY DAVID GALULA
“LEADERSHIP: THE WARRIOR’S ART” BY CHRISTOPHER D. KOLENDA, WALTER F., JR. ULMER, AND BARRY R. MCCAFFREY
“THE MISSION, THE MEN AND ME” BY PETE BLABER
“THE SAVAGE WARS OF PEACE” BY MAX BOOT
“SOLDIERS OF GOD” BY ROBERT D. KAPLAN
“THE SPEED OF TRUST” BY STEPHEN M.R. COVEY
“STORM LANDINGS” BY JOSEPH H. ALEXANDER
“A TACTICAL ETHIC” BY DICK COUCH
“THE VILLAGE” BY BING WEST

M.  1ST LIEUTENANT/CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 3.
THE FIRST SEVEN BOOKS OF THIS LIST SHOULD BE READ IN ORDER AS THEY TRACE THE EVOLUTION OF WARFARE FROM FIRST TO FOURTH GENERATION.
“THE ENLIGHTENED SOLDIER” BY CHARLES EDWARD WHITE
“SEEDS OF DISASTER” BY ROBERT DOUGHTY
“STORMTROOPER TACTICS” BY BRUCE I. GUDMUNDSSON
“COMMAND OR CONTROL” BY MARIN SAMUELS
“THE BREAKING POINT” BY ROBERT DOUGHTY
“FIGHTING POWER” BY MARTIN L. VAN CREVELD
“TRANSFORMATION OF WAR” BY MARTIN L. VAN CREVELD
“ATTACKS” BY ERWIN ROMMEL
“BATTLE LEADERSHIP” BY ADOLF VON SCHELL
“THE PELOPONNESIAN WAR” BY DONALD KAGAN
“THE LAST STAND OF FOX COMPANY” BY BOB DRURY AND TOM CLAVIN

N.  CAPTAIN/CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 4
“THE ARAB MIND” BY RAPHAEL PATAI
“THE DEFENSE OF HILL 781” BY JAMES MCDONOUGH
“THE GENERAL” BY C.S. FORRESTER
“LIONS OF IWO JIMA” BY FRED HAYNES
“LOST VICTORIES” BY ERICH VON MANSTEIN
“THE MASK OF COMMAND” BY JOHN KEGAN
“PASSION OF COMMAND” BY BRYAN MCCOY
“SOURCES OF POWER” BY GARY KLEIN
“STARSHIP TROOPERS” BY ROBERT HEINLEIN
“THE TIPPING POINT” BY MALCOM GLADWELL
“VICTORY AT HIGH TIDE” BY ROBERT D. HEINL
“WE WERE SOLDIERS ONCE AND YOUNG” BY HAROLD G. MOORE AND JOSEPH L. GALLOWAY

O.  MAJOR/CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER 5
“THE CRUCIBLE OF WAR” BY FRED ANDERSON
“THE GUNS OF AUGUST” BY BARBARA W. TUCHMAN
“IN THE GRAY AREA” BY SETH FOLSOM
“THIS KIND OF WAR” BY T.R. FEHRENBACH
“THE LANDMARK THUCYDIDES” BY ROBERT STRASSLER
“THE LAST STAND:  CUSTER, SITTING BULL, AND THE BATTLE OF LITTLE BIGHORN” BY NATHANIEL PHILBRICK
“THE LEXUS AND THE OLIVE TREE” BY THOMAS FRIEDMAN
“MASTERS OF WAR” BY MICHAEL HANDEL
“ONCE AN EAGLE” BY ANTON MYRER
“TEAM OF RIVALS:  THE POLITICAL GENIUS OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN” BY DORIS GOODWIN
“TIGER FORCE:  A TRUE STORY OF MEN AND WAR” BY M. SALLAH AND M. WEISS
“UTMOST SAVAGERY:  THE THREE DAYS OF TARAWA” BY JOSEPH H. ALEXANDER
“WIRED FOR WAR” BY P.W. SINGER

P.  LIEUTENANT COLONEL
“A BELL FOR ADANO” BY JOHN HERSEY
“ACCIDENTAL GUERILLA” BY DAVID KILCULLEN
“AT THE WATER’S EDGE:  DEFENDING AGAINST THE MODERN AMPHIBIOUS ASSAULT” BY THEODORE GATCHEL
“THE BLITZKRIEG LEGEND” BY KARL-HEINZ FRIESER
“THE BOTTOM BILLION” BY PAUL COLLIER
“BRUTE: THE LIFE OF VICTOR KRULAK” BY ROBERT CORAM
“CARNAGE AND CULTURE” BY VICTOR HANSON
“DEFEAT INTO VICTORY” BY WILLIAM SLIM
“FORGOTTEN WARRIORS” BY THOMAS HAMMES
“A PEACE TO END ALL PEACE” BY DAVID FROMKIN
“SEVEN DEADLY SCENARIOS” BY ANDREW KREPINEVICH

Q.  COLONEL TO GENERAL
“ANOTHER BLOODY CENTURY” BY COLIN GRAY
“THE COLDEST WINTER” BY DAVID HALBERSTAM
“THE CRISIS OF ISLAM” BY BERNARD LEWIS
“DECODING CLAUSEWITZ” BY JON SUMIDA
“DERELICTION OF DUTY:  JOHNSON, MCNAMARA, THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF, AND THE LIES THAT LED TO VIETNAM” BY H.R. MCMASTER
“DIPLOMACY” BY HENRY KISSINGER
“FAULT LINES:  HOW HIDDEN FRACTURES STILL THREATEN THE WORLD” BY RAGHURAM RAJAN
“HOW WARS END” BY GIDEON ROSE
“POORER RICHARD’S AMERICA” BY TOM BLAIR
“TRIED BY WAR:  ABRAHAM LINCOLN AS COMMANDER IN CHIEF” BY JAMES MCPHERSON
“SUPREME COMMAND:  SOLDIERS, STATESMEN, AND LEADERSHIP IN WARTIME” BY ELIOT A. COHEN

R.  THE LIST CAN ALSO BE FOUND AT
WWW.MCU.USMC.MIL/LEJEUNE_LEADERSHIP/PAGES/PROPROGBRANCH.ASPX

6.  SEMPER FIDELIS, JAMES F. AMOS, GENERAL, U.S. MARINE CORPS, COMMANDANT OF THE MARINE CORPS.//

Respectfully,
Richard Pellish
AC/S G-2, MCBJ, Okinawa, Japan
Room 100A, Building 1
Camp Foster
FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY – This transmission contains information that is protected from disclosure by the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 USC 552a) and exemption (b) (6) of the Freedom of Information Act (5 USC 552, as amended). Please ensure that this information is used solely for the required purpose. Civil and/or criminal penalties can apply for improper use. If you have received this email in error, please delete it and notify me immediately.

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USMC Eagle Globe Anchor 1868-1968

Courtesy: HISTORY AND MUSEUMS DIVISION, HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS, WASHINGTON, D.C., 1968

The purpose of this study is to explore and describe the development of the emblem and to provide students of Marine Corps history with a reference for its display on the diversity of uniforms worn by Marines since 1868.

EGA 1868-1968 Part 1 pdf 4.3MB
EGA 1868-1968 Part 2 pdf 3.7MB
EGA 1868-1968 Part 3 pdf 3.1MB

ALWAYS FAITHFUL!

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HMX-1 to get MV-22s

from defensetech.org

Here’s another piece of cool V-22 Osprey news to emerge from the Navy League’s Sea, Air, Space conference; HMX-1, the Marine Corps chopper squadron that operates the fleet of Marine One presidential transport helos is set to receive the first of what will be a fleet of 14 MV-22s, starting in 2013 .

This was revealed by Marine Col. Greg Masiello, NAVAIR’s V-22 program manager during a press briefing at the conference yesterday.

The Ospreys will likely be replacing the unit’s VH-43D Sea Stallions (shown below) which are sometimes used to transport the president’s gear and perform other utility duties for the squadron. The aging VH-53Ds are being pulled out of presidential support duty to return to normal cargo hauling missions until the Corps’ thinning fleet of Sea Stallions is retired in the coming years, said Col. Roger Pridgen, NAVAIR’s H-53 program manager earlier this week.

Read the full story: http://defensetech.org/2011/04/13/usmc-presidential-chopper-squadron-to-get-mv-22s/

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17th Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps Announced

from Marine Corps Connection

WASHINGTON — The commandant of the Marine Corps announced April 11 his selection for the next sergeant major of the Marine Corps.

Sgt. Maj. Michael Barrett

“I’m pleased to announce Sgt. Maj. Micheal P. Barrett as the 17th sergeant major of the Marine Corps,” said Gen. James Amos, commandant of the Marine Corps. “Sgt. Maj. Barrett, through his long and distinguished service to our nation, has demonstrated that he is particularly well-suited to serve as my senior enlisted advisor through the challenges ahead. My wife Bonnie and I welcome him and his wife Susan and look forward to serving with them.”

Barrett will replace Sgt. Maj. Carlton W. Kent, who has served as the sergeant major of the Marine Corps since April 25, 2007. The relief and appointment ceremony and retirement of Kent is scheduled for June 9 at Marine Barracks Washington.

Barrett recently returned from Afghanistan where he served as the sergeant major of Regional Command Southwest and I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward). He currently serves as the sergeant major of 1st Marine Division at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif.

Barrett’s official biography can be found at: http://www.i-mef.usmc.mil/external/1stmardiv/command/biographies/sgtmaj/micheal.barrett.jsp

The post of sergeant major of the Marine Corps was established in 1957 as the senior enlisted advisor to the commandant of the Marine Corps, the first such post in any of the branches of the United States Armed Forces. The sergeant major of the Marine Corps is selected by the commandant, and typically serves a four-year term, though his service is at the pleasure of the commandant.

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Marine Corps will be smaller, lighter but just as deadly, commandant promises

Feb 8, Los Angeles Times

The Marine Corps of the future will be smaller and use lighter vehicles and lighter personal protective gear but retain its ability to respond swiftly and with intimidating firepower to any global crisis, Commandant Gen. James Amos said Tuesday night.

General Amos

The Marine Corps will add more personnel and resources to its Special Operations Command — the Marines’ equivalent of the Army’s special forces — and to its force guarding against attack via cyberspace.

The Marines, Amos said in a speech at the Marine Memorial Club in San Francisco, will be a “middleweight force” ready to move quickly, probably from ships, to buy time for U.S. officials to decide on a long-term response to a crisis.

Amos pointed to the recent deployment of Marines to support a Camp Pendleton-based battalion in the bitter fight in the Sangin area of Afghanistan as the kind of capability that the Marine Corps will continue to provide.

Within three days of the decision by Defense Secretary Robert Gates, Marines aboard ships off Pakistan were part of the fight in Sangin, including with their own attack aircraft. The Camp Pendleton-based Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment has been in a bloody battle with Taliban fighters since late September.

The new troops from the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, Amos said, are “in direct support of Gen. [David] Petraeus’ winter campaign. Their efforts are further driving a wedge between the insurgents and the local Afghan populace.”

Amos’ speech was billed as his response to a speech made by Gates last year in the same venue in which he challenged the Marine Corps to define its post-Afghanistan role and to anticipate reduced budgets as the nation struggles with a sour economy. Congressional leaders have been briefed on the Marine Corps plans, Amos said.

Amos said the Marine Corps is ready to “right-size” its force. He did not mention numbers but most observers expect a reduction from the current 202,000 level to about 180,000 Marines.

Amos stood by his decision to support cancellation of the $14-billion project to develop what is called the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle that can take Marines from ship to shore. Rather, Amos said, the Marine Corps will begin developing a less expensive amphibious vehicle to do the same task.

“I want to assure you that the Marine Corps will remain our nation’s expeditionary force in readiness and remain the force-of-choice for crisis response,” he said.

Source: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2011/02/the-marine-corps-of-the-future-will-be-smaller-anduse-lighter-vehicles-and-lighter-personal-protective-gear-but-retain-its-ab.html

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Gates Challenges Marine Corps’ Mission

The Marine Corps is facing a historic defeat at the hands of Defense Secretary Roberts Gates, and hardly anyone inside or outside the Corps seems to grasp what is happening. On January 6, Gates disclosed a series of proposed budget cuts that included termination of an amphibious vehicle the Marines have been developing for 15 years. He said the vehicle cost too much — around $17 million per copy — and that the service therefore should extend the life of existing amphibious vehicles while searching for a more affordable replacement. Gates stressed that, “This decision does not call into question the Marines’ amphibious assault mission.”

Read the full article: Gates Challenges Marine Corps’ Mission:

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